Sermon on the Mount (part 5) Audio

On Sunday, May 28, 2017 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a message based on Matthew 5:17-48.  This message was part 5 of the “Sermon on the Mount” series.  The audio from this message is posted below to listen to or share.

 

To listen offline, click the link to download:

Sermon on the Mount #5

 

To listen online, use the media player below:

Sermon on the Mount (Part 5) Questions

On Sunday, May 28, 2017 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a sermon based on Matthew 5:17-48.  This message was part 5 of the “Sermon on the Mount” series.  Below are a set of questions for personal reflection or group discussion related to the message.

Sermon Questions:

  1. Pray
  2. Read Matthew 5:17-48
  3. How has the pain of divorce impacted your life?  How does Jesus’ teaching on divorce encourage/discourage you?
  4. Where are you currently being tempted to exact personal revenge for a past hurt?  How does Jesus’ teaching in 5:38-42 challenge you?
  5. Who is someone who feels “unloveable” to you?  How can you begin to love them through prayer this week?
  6. React to John Stott’s comments on this section of the Sermon on the Mount – “Only a belief in the necessity and the possibility of a new birth can keep us from reading the Sermon on the Mount with either foolish optimism or hopeless despair.”
  7. What is one particular application you took away from this passage/message?

To access these questions in pdf format, click here.

Sermon on the Mount (part 5) Preview

Imagine you are in High School or college (I know . . . how dare I ask such a question on the first day of summer break!).  Now imagine you have a big test coming up on Tuesday.  How much do you need to study for that test?  The answer (of course) is tied to the nature of the class,  your aptitude for the subject, and the temperament of the teacher. The more complex the subject, the more you would need to study (calculus vs. PE).  The more challenging the subject is for you, the harder you would need to work (“science people” understand science more easily than poets).  The more a teacher was known for their high standards and difficult tests, the harder we would need to work.

I share this thought with you today in preparation for our final look at Matthew 5:17-48 on Sunday at Wildwood Community Church.  In this section of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus is defining for us the “righteous” standard of God.  A standard by which we will be judged.  Jesus lets us know that the nature of this “test” is complex – a high standard that we should not relax (Matthew 5:19).  He lets us know that the standard is challenging for all people – calling us to a standard of righteousness that exceeds the most religious people known (Matthew 5:20).  Further, the “teacher” who sits sovereign over this test is God Himself who is HOLY, and uses His holiness as the standard by which He judges the test (Matthew 5:48).  WOW!  With this test on the horizon, how can we stand?

To this end, John Stott offers a good perspective that offers us hope –

“Only a belief in the necessity and the possibility of a new birth can keep us from reading the Sermon on the Mount with either foolish optimism or hopeless despair.” 

As followers of Christ we have a hope to see His righteousness flow through us from the inside out, impacting our marriages (5:31-32) and our relationships with those who seek to do evil against us (5:38-47).  This Sunday we will look at these verses together in our 8:30, 9:45, and 11:00 worship services.  Hope to see you there!

Sermon on the Mount (part 4) Sermon Audio

On Sunday, May 14, 2017 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a sermon based on Matthew 5:17-48.  This was the fourth part in the “Sermon on the Mount” series.  Below I have posted the audio from this message to listen to or share.

To listen offline, click on the link to download audio:

Sermon on the Mount #4

 

To listen online, use the media player below:

Sermon on the Mount (part 4) Sermon Questions

On Sunday, May 14, 2017 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a message on Matthew 5:17-48.  This message was part 4 in the “Sermon on the Mount” series.  Below are a set of questions related to the message for further reflection or group discussion.

Sermon Questions:

  1. Pray
  2. Read Matthew 5:17-48
  3. What are some human traditions or cultural ideas that have obscured God’s clear teaching on moral issues today?
  4. Jesus clarified God’s righteous standard on 3 issues we looked at in today’s message:  murder (5:21-26), adultery (5:27-30), and lying (5:33-37). Though this sermon is 2000 years old, it still is amazingly relevant in today’s world. How does Jesus clarify God’s standards in these three areas?  How does Jesus definition run counter to TODAY’S common understanding of what is appropriate in each of these three areas?
  5. How significant does Jesus think violating God’s standard in these three areas is?  How can you tell from the text (look at 5:22, 29, 37)?
  6. Pick one of these three areas that you feel is an area of particular struggle for you right now.  How do you react to Jesus’ call in that area?  What do you need to do or stop doing to follow Christ in all areas of your life?
  7. Have you trusted in Christ for the forgiveness of your sins?  How does being reminded of God’s deep standards encourage you to lean into Christ even more?
  8. What is one particular application you took away from this passage/message?

To access these questions in pdf format, click here.

Sermon on the Mount (part 4) Preview

Who do you think holds the record for the longest football pass in history?  Some would argue for Brett Favre.  Others might think it is Dan Marino or John Elway.  Still others might push for Aaron Rogers or Johnny Unitas.  Whatever your guess might be, virtually all would assume it was someone who once starred in the National Football League.

If one of these were your guess, you would be wrong.  The longest football pass was actually by Tim Kopra – a man who has never played a down in the NFL.  In fact, I don’t even know that he played in college!  Tim is not even a professional athlete; he is an astronaut living on the International Space Station.  Last February, to honor the Super Bowl, he threw a football in space’s weightless conditions (and aboard a vessel traveling 17, 500 mph) a whopping 564,664 yards.  This is the distance of over 5,600 football fields stacked end to end!!!!!  Unreal! 

 

This is truly a record that will not be broken . . . at least not by anyone on this earth.  If the record throw was done under normal conditions, we might imagine someone who is able to actually throw the ball farther . . . but the change in domain actually makes this record untouchable to other “earthlings.”  In order to throw a ball that far, someone would have to be out of this world.  Literally.

I was thinking about this today as I read Matthew 5.  In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus calls His followers to adhere to His deeper standard of righteousness.  This sounds good, but upon further examination, it seems to be calling us to an “out of this world” standard.  Not only are we to be obedient on the playing field of our observable life, but also in the space station of our thought life.  How can we ever achieve the record of righteousness Jesus requires?

The key to this kind of righteousness is truly “out of this world.”  In Christ, a righteousness is provided for us that is both “deep” and “wide.”  Jesus has thrown the moral ball well over 560,000 yards for us.  Further, He provides the grace to enable us to follow Him to record levels of obedience as we trust in Him.

No player on this earth can throw a football the length of one field, much less the lengths of thousands, and no human can live the perfect life God has called us to . . . but Jesus is out of this world!  In Matthew 5:17-48 Jesus demonstrates the thousands of yards that His righteous standard demands, so that we would trust in Him (and not ourselves) as we throw our lives toward eternity.

This Sunday at Wildwood Community Church in our 8:30, 9:45, and 11:00 worship services, we will be looking at part 4 of the Sermon on the Mount series as we see what space age righteousness looks like related to our anger, lust, and honesty.  Join us this Mother’s Day Sunday . . . and bring a friend!

Sermon on the Mount (part 3) Sermon Audio

On Sunday, May 7, 2017 at Wildwood Community Church I preached a message based on Matthew 5:17-48.  This message was part 3 in the “Sermon on the Mount” series.  Below you will find the sermon audio to listen to or share.

Click link to download and listen offline:

Sermon on the Mount #3

 

Use the online media player below to listen online:

Sermon on the Mount (part 3) Sermon Questions

On Sunday, May 7, 2017 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a message based on Matthew 5:17-48.  This message was part 3 in the Sermon on the Mount series.  Below are a set of questions related to the message for personal reflection or group discussion.

Sermon Questions:

  1. Pray
  2. Read Matthew 5:17-48
  3. If you “took your faith public” after last Sunday’s message, what did you do?  How did it go?
  4. Have you ever thought that it is easier to be a Christian than to be an Old Testament Jew?  In what way is this true? 
  5. What do you think Jesus meant when He said that He came to fulfill the law not abolish it?
  6. What are ways you have seen others (or yourself) try to “relax” God’s standards?  How do you see Jesus “deepen” our understanding of God’s standards? 
  7. When was the last time you confessed your sin to God?  If it has been a while, take the time to do it now.  Know that there is forgiveness for those who are in Christ Jesus!
  8. What is one particular application you took away from this passage/message?

To access these questions in pdf format, click here.

Sermon on the Mount (part 3) Preview

The difference between my son and I is 33 years and 2 feet.  33 years on the calendar, and 2 feet on the growth chart.  Of course there are other differences, but these are the two easiest to see.

Now imagine my son trying to wear my clothes.  Comical isn’t it?  My golf shirts look like bed sheets on his body, though they fit me just fine.  My shoes will hardly stay on his feet, but they feel just right to me.  Josh may put on my clothes and pretend they are his, but any discerning eye can easily see that he does not fill them out.

I was thinking about this today as I reflected upon the Sermon on the Mount – specifically the section from Matthew 5:17-48.  In these verses Jesus begins to explain what “good works” He was talking about in 5:16. In the first century, people had an awareness of the ten commandments – Do not murder, do not commit adultery, do not lie, etc.  In fact, the Scribes and the Pharisees had even divided and defined these commandments in such a way that they were attainable for the religiously committed.  When Jesus begins to preach, though, He calls ALL (even the religious leaders) to “repent.”  Repentance is necessary because Jesus knew that the righteous “clothes” God wants us to put on are actually 2 feet larger than any of us ever imagined.  Though we may try in our own strength to wear God’s clothes, they simply do not fit.  They drape about us like bed sheets covering our meager virtue.

There is One, however, who can truly fills out the righteousness God described in the Law.  That One is Jesus.  “I have come to fulfill them (the Law),” Jesus said in 5:17.  He fills out the full uniform of the Law and the Prophets to show us our true moral size and to remind us of our need for Him.

This Sunday at Wildwood Community Church, we will be continuing our series on the Sermon on the Mount by looking at Matthew 5:17-48 in our morning worship services (at 8:30, 9:45, and 11:00).  We will study these verses together and also celebrate the Lord’s supper together.  I hope you can join us Sunday!

Salt and Light Opportunities

This morning in the sermon at Wildwood Community Church, we focused on Matthew 5:11-16.  These verses detail for us both what we can expect from the world (persecution), but also what the world can expect from us (rejoicing, impactful, and visible lives).

In the message (you can access the sermon audio online here), I mentioned a number of ways Wildwood (as a church) is involved in shining as light and serving as salt in our world.  Below are a list of links for how to get involved with these ministries going forward:

“Let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven.” – Jesus (in Matthew 5:16)

I concluded the message by challenging all to “take our faith public” this week by serving someone new.  If you take a step in this direction this week . . . LET ME KNOW ABOUT IT!  Email me at markrobinson@wildwoodchurch.org , or comment to this post and let me know how you have been salt and light this week.