Christmas Light (Part 2) Sermon Preview

55 years ago, Minnesota Viking Defensive End Jim Marshall was involved in one of the most famous plays in NFL history.  Though no NFL defender has ever played more seasons, and though Marshall recovered an NFL record 30 fumbles in his career, he will always be remembered for a particularly grievous mistake he made in a 1964 game against the San Francisco 49ers.

At a critical point in this game, the Vikings’ “Purple People Eaters” defense forced a fumble from a 49er ball carrier that was scooped up by Marshall.  In the excitement and confusion of the moment, Marshall got turned around and ran 66 yards THE WRONG WAY into his own end zone.  Thinking he just scored a touchdown, he threw the ball out of bounds in celebration, resulting in a safety.  Though he worked hard (recovered a fumble and quickly ran 66 yards), and though he sincerely thought he had scored, he was mistaken.  Instead of “winning” he was “losing” – that moment at least.

I was thinking about Marshall’s moment today as I reflected upon John 1:1-14.  In this passage of Scripture, Jesus is referred to as both “Life” and “Light.”  These are two things that virtually all of humanity wants and needs.  In fact, they are intimately connected.  You cannot have life without light.  When God created the world at the beginning of all things, He FIRST created light, as it was necessary for everything else to survive (Genesis 1:3).  Though all of us want and need life and light, we sometimes run the wrong way to find them.

In the confusion of life, it is all too easy for us to get turned around and headed in the wrong direction.  Sometimes we think that Jesus (or at least the version of Christianity we are familiar with) wants death and darkness for us . . . to remove the fun out of life by telling us what we cannot do.  In the temptation of everyday life, we scoop up an “opportunity” and run in the opposite direction of Jesus, headed towards drugs, pornography, an affair, gossip, the accumulation of material possessions, etc. thinking that if we run hard enough in that direction, we will “win” the satisfaction of enjoyment.  The problem is, these temptations do not produce the celebrations we desire.  When we reach that “end zone,” like Marshall’s “wrong way run,” we find shame and not satisfaction.

When John tells us that Jesus is both Life and Light, he is like a coach reminding us which goal line we were created to move towards.  Jesus does ask us to follow Him as He heads in a particular direction . . . but that direction is always life and not death; light and not darkness.  This is not to say that there will not be challenges as we follow Christ . . . but it is to say that those challenges are momentary, while the “win” is eternal.  When we do not follow Christ, it is just the opposite . . . the ecstatic feelings are fleeting, but the “loss” lasts.  

This Sunday at Wildwood, we will continue our series “Christmas Light” by looking at John 1:1-14.  In this message we will see what is meant by Jesus being Life and Light.  I know you want Life and Light for yourself and for those you know.  Come this Sunday, and invite your friends, as we explore this theme together in God’s Word.  Additionally, the children will be singing this Sunday in our worship services at the end of the services (this is an annual Wildwood tradition!).  We can’t wait to worship with you this holiday season.  See you Sunday at 9:45 or 11:00.

December 5: Christmas Light – “Breath of Heaven”

Breath of Heaven

Do you want a “blessed” life?  Of course you do!  Who doesn’t, right?  Only a hardcore atheist that does not believe in a “Bless-or” is repelled by the concept of being blessed by their Creator.  However, what does the blessing of God look like, and how do we get on the blessed list . . . these are questions we often debate or question.

After Mary is visited by Gabriel and told she was carrying the Son of God, she goes to visit her relative Elizabeth (Luke 1:39-45).  At that time, Elizabeth declares to Mary that she is indeed “blessed” by God (Luke 1:42).  Of course, the blessing Elizabeth was referring to was the Baby Mary was carrying in her womb . . . but a closer reading of this passage (in context) also reveals to us another way Mary was blessed in Luke 1.

After being visited by the Angel Gabriel, Mary was left to ponder her new found pregnancy in (somewhat) isolation.  Her parents would have been concerned.  Her betrothed (Joseph) was considering a divorce.  Who would believe her?  Did she really hear the Angel correctly?  These were probably some of the questions Mary was asking.  

So, where does she go?  How does God provide and bless Mary in the midst of her situation?  The Lord has Mary walk 50-70 miles to the hills of Judah to visit Elizabeth:  the only other woman in the world who would understand miraculous pregnancies (see Luke 1:5-25)!  The Lord blessed Mary through another person – her cousin Elizabeth’s company!

That said, here are two thoughts:

  1. Can you imagine what Mary may have been thinking as she walked to Elizabeth’s house?  The song “Breath of Heaven” shares a fictionalized perspective from Mary as she made that walk.  Listen to this song today as you relate to her circumstance.
  2. Realize that the “Breath of Heaven’s” blessing that fell on Mary at that time was not a second angelic visit, but a cup of coffee with her cousin.  

Where in your life right now are you longing for the supernatural provision of God?  Have you ever stopped to think that the blessing of God . . . the breath of heaven . . . may be coming to you by another member of the Body of Christ who lives down the street, or is in your small group, or is just a phone call away.  The supernatural blessing of God is often wrapped in natural paper.

Breath of Heaven

I have traveled many moonless nights

Cold and weary with a babe inside

And I wonder what I’ve done

Holy Father, You have come

And chosen me now to carry Your Son

I am waiting in a silent prayer

I am frightened by the load I bear

In a world as cold as stone

Must I walk this path alone?

Be with me now, be with me now

Breath of Heaven, hold me together

Be forever near me, breath of Heaven

Breath of Heaven, lighten my darkness

Pour over me Your holiness for You are holy

Breath of Heaven

Do you wonder as you watch my face

If a wiser one should have had my place?

But I offer all I am

For the mercy of Your plan

Help me be strong, help me be, help me

 

To access all 31 days of the “Christmas Light” Devotional, click here.

To access the “Christmas Light” Playlist:

December 4: Christmas Light – “Elizabeth”

Elizabeth

When Luke picked up a pen and began to write about the birth of Jesus, he did not begin with Mary . . . or Joseph . . . he began with a man named Zechariah and his wife Elizabeth.  Their story (not Mary and Joseph’s) kicks off Luke’s Gospel, and it is the conception of their son John (not the immaculate conception of Jesus) that is the first reason to celebrate in this book.  This makes sense, because Zechariah and Elizabeth’s son (John the Baptist) would be the one who would “go before Jesus in the spirit and power of Elijah to turn the hearts of the fathers to the children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the just to make ready for the Lord a people prepared (Luke 1:17).”  By definition John would come first because he was the forerunner to Jesus.

Even knowing that, it is still striking how much space Luke gives (under the direction of the Holy Spirit) to the story of Zechariah and Elizabeth.  You can read the account for yourselves in Luke 1:5-25, 39-45, 57-80.  What does God want us to see in this account?  Well, here are a couple of thoughts:

  1. The angel Gabriel appears to Zechariah and promises Zechariah and Elizabeth a child.  Zechariah and Elizabeth were “advanced in age” and well past their child conceiving days.  Upon hearing this news, Zechariah doubts its veracity.  Because of this doubt, Zechariah is struck silent for the duration of the pregnancy.  Zechariah’s silence mirrors the 400 years of silence that the nation of Israel had in the days leading up to John the Baptist’s birth.  For those 400 years, God did not speak to His people through the prophets.  The extra nine months of silence that Zechariah experiences mirror the silence the nation had endured before God as they wandered in the darkness of unbelief.  When John is born, however, God begins to speak again to His people . . . and Zechariah is the first of a new order of prophets that would continue to share God’s voice to His people through the writing of the New Testament — all “making ready for the Lord a people prepared.”
  2. If we see the voice of God returning through Zechariah, we see something else in the account of his wife Elizabeth.  Elizabeth was an older woman . . . well past child bearing days, and yet her womb was barren.  Over time, her empty arms had become a heavy burden.  While all the other moms were getting cards on Mother’s Day and a visible legacy to shape, Elizabeth’s childlessness had become (in her words) a “reproach among people (Luke 1:25).”  The birth of John was not just about what the Lord was doing in the world, it was an act of compassion and kindness to Elizabeth.  Her womb opened.  The promise of God turned into a person . . . a gift. 

Keith Getty wrote a beautiful tribute to the emotion of this historical account in the song, “Elizabeth.”  The ache of Elizabeth’s empty arms were filled with the life that only God can bring.  This is a reminder to all who come after that in Christ, God can do “far more abundantly than all that we ask or think, according to the power at work within us (Ephesians 3:20).”  

What are you “aching” about today?  Lay your head upon His promises and find your rest in Jesus Christ.

 

Elizabeth

Elizabeth, There’s an echo in your voice I’ve heard before,

Such emptiness

All the years of crying out for something more,

But you have lived to see

That joy comes in the morning

Come and lay your head

On His promises

Oh, find your rest, Elizabeth

Elizabeth, Feel the baby dance for joy within your womb,

Magnificent, Mary’s Son is sent to overcome the tomb,

But you have lived to see

That joy comes in the morning

Come and lay your head

On His promises

Oh, find your rest, Elizabeth

Woman after woman who will follow

Will carry beauty and a longing of their own

But when I hear the rhythm of your name

Oh, I remember once again

That none of us will ache without a living hope

Elizabeth, Oh, blessed is the one who has believed

In the Rising Son Who will guide our feet into the path of peace

For we will live to see That joy comes in the morning

Come and lay your head

On His promises

Oh, find your rest

Come and lay your head

On His promises

Oh, find your rest

Elizabeth

Elizabeth

 

To access all 31 days of the “Christmas Light” Devotional, click here.

To access the “Christmas Light” Playlist:

December 3: Christmas Light – “Come Thou Long Expected Jesus”

Come Thou Long Expected Jesus

The very first churches I knew were Methodist.  Most every Sunday for the first 18 years of my life you could find me somewhere around East Cross United Methodist Church in Bartlesville, Oklahoma.  Of the many blessings I received from that heritage was a knowledge of John and Charles Wesley.  Though the Wesley’s never set out to start “Methodism” God used them to reform the Church of England and call it to both passion and application.  If Luther’s reform in Germany was about orthodoxy, the Wesley’s reform in England 200 years later was about orthopraxy . . . as much about what we do as what we believe.

While John Wesley was the preacher, Charles Wesley is best known for the hymns he wrote.  One of the 18 Christmas carols Wesley wrote was “Come Thou Long Expected Jesus.”  This song not only laid out sound theology and Scriptural references, but called followers of Jesus to act in certain ways.

The first verse points out Jesus has released us from our “fears and sins” (Romans 6:5-11).  This is a theological truth . . . but the application of this truth is that we would find “our rest in Thee.”

In the second verse, Jesus is described as “a child, and yet a King (Isaiah 9:6-7).”  Charles takes the next line, though, and drives it home, saying that Jesus was “Born to reign in us forever . . . Rule in all our hearts alone.”  The application is not just to say that Jesus is the “King of Kings,” but to have Him be our King – the ultimate authority in our lives.  

This Christmas, as you sing Wesley’s song, may you have a reformation of your practice.  May you find your rest in Jesus, the ultimate authority in your life!

Come Thou Long Expected Jesus

Come, thou long expected Jesus
born to set thy people free
from our fears and sins release us
let us find our rest in thee
Israel’s strength and consolation
hope of all the earth thou art
dear desire of every nation
joy of every longing heart

Born thy people to deliver
born a child and yet a King
born to reign in us forever
now thy gracious kingdom bring
By thine own eternal spirit
rule in all our hearts alone
by thine all sufficient merit
raise us to thy glorious throne

You draw the hearts of shepherds
You draw the hearts of kings
Even as a baby
You were changing everything
You called me to Your Kingdom
Before Your lips could speak
And even as a baby
You were reaching out for me

And now we are awaiting
The day of Your return
When every eye will see You
As heaven comes to earth
Until the sky is opened
Until the trumpet sounds
The bride is getting ready
The church is singing out

Come, thou long expected Jesus
born to set thy people free
from our fears and sins release us
let us find our rest in thee
Come Thou long expected King

 

To access all 31 days of the “Christmas Light” Devotional, click here.

To access the “Christmas Light” Playlist:

December 2: Christmas Light – “O Come O Come Emmanuel”

O Come, O Come Emmanuel

Some songs are old, having been sung for decades.  Then there is “O Come, O Come Emmanuel.”  This song has a history that goes all the way back to the eighth century – over 1,300 years ago!  The words were originally written as a poem and not arranged to music as a Christmas carol until the twelfth century.

Have you ever wondered what causes a song to endure for that long?  Why are we still singing it?  Though the music is beautiful, there are many beautiful songs.  I think the enduring nature of this song is found in its message of hope.  

The song is really a beautiful expectation.  In fact, the poem on which it was based is arranged as an acrostic that spelled out the phrase “ero cras” which translates to “I will be with you tomorrow.”  The underlying theme of the song is that the world is not yet what it will be.  Drawing its imagery from the nation of Israel in the Old Testament days waiting for the arrival of the promised Savior, these lyrics talk about how the arrival of God the Son (Jesus — “Emmanuel” means God with us), began to make good on a number of promises God had made to His people.  

Today as we sing this song we still have a sense of expectation.  The world still is not yet what it will be.  We still live in a world of sin, pain, violence, illness, etc.  We long to see this world change . . . to be redeemed and restored.  As Romans 8:19-25 says, “For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God.  For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption and obtain the freedom of the glory of the children of God.  For we know that the whole creation has been groaning together in the pains of childbirth until now.  And not only the creation, but we ourselves, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.  For in this hope we are saved.  Now hope that is seen is not hope.  For who hopes for what he sees?  But if we hope for what we do not see, we wait for it with patience.” 

So as you sing “O Come, O Come Emmanuel” this Christmas, may you remember the first fruits that came from Jesus’ first coming at Bethlehem.  May that give you hope that “He will be with us tomorrow.”  And, when Jesus comes back, our bodies will be redeemed and the world will be restored.  Therefore, we sing (and wait) with a patient hope.

O Come, O Come Emmanuel

O come, O come, Emmanuel

And ransom captive Israel

That mourns in lonely exile here

Until the Son of God appear

Rejoice, rejoice, Emmanuel

Shall come to thee, O Israel

 

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse, free

Thine own from Satan’s tyranny

From depths of Hell Thy people save

And give them victory o’er the grave

Rejoice, rejoice, Emmanuel

Shall come to thee, o Israel

 

O come, Thou Day-Spring

Come and cheer

Our spirits by Thine advent here

Disperse the gloomy clouds of night

And death’s dark shadows put to flight

Rejoice, rejoice, Emmanuel

Shall come to thee, o Israel

 

O come, Thou Key of David, come

And open wide our heavenly home

Make safe the way that leads on high

And close the path to misery

Rejoice, rejoice, Emmanuel

Shall come to thee, o Israel

 

O come, O come, Thou Lord of might

Who to Thy tribes, on Sinai’s height

In ancient times did’st give the Law

In cloud, and majesty and awe

Rejoice, rejoice, Emmanuel

Shall come to thee, o Israel

 

 

To access all 31 days of the “Christmas Light” Devotional, click here.

To access the “Christmas Light” Playlist:

Christmas Light (part 1) Sermon Audio

On Sunday, December 1, 2019 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a sermon based on Isaiah 9:1-7.  This message was part 1 in the “Christmas Light” sermon series.  Below you will find the audio from this message to listen to, download, or share.

 

To listen offline, click the link to download the audio:

Christmas Light #1 12.1.19

 

To listen online, use the media player below:

 

To watch the stream of the entire worship service, watch the YouTube video below:

 

Christmas Light (part 1) Sermon Questions

On Sunday, December 1, 2019 at Wildwood Community Church, I preached a sermon based on Isaiah 9:1-7 and Matthew 4:12-17.  This message was part 1 in the “Christmas Light” sermon series.  Below are a list of questions related to this message for personal reflection or group discussion.

Sermon Questions:

  1. Pray
  2. Read Isaiah 9:1-7
  3. In what way do you think that “lights” are especially relevant decorations for Christians at Christmas time?
  4. Reading Isaiah 9:1-2, we see the audience described as in anguish, gloom, contempt, and in darkness.  What evidence do you see today that our world also struggles from these conditions?
  5. What are some of the things you see in the world today that make you long for God to intervene and set things “right”?
  6. How have you personally dealt with the “darkness” of the world?  Are you dealing with despair, depression, etc. right now?
  7. The coming of the “child” in Isaiah’s prophecy brings with it a number of “upgrades” described in Isaiah 9:1-7.  Does it surprise you that the coming of Jesus brings with it so many societal changes?  We talk often of Jesus saving us from our sins, but this prophecy speaks of Jesus changing the world!  
  8. Jesus came to turn on the light and rebuild the world.  Have you repented of your sin, and begun living your life in the light of Jesus?
  9. Who will you invite into the light with you this Christmas season?
  10. What is one particular application you took away from this message?

To access these questions in pdf format, click here.

 

To access all 31 days of the “Christmas Light” Devotional, click here.

To access the “Christmas Light” Playlist:

December 1: Christmas Light – “Light of the World”

Light of the World

3,500 years ago, God called His people (the Israelites) out of Egypt, through the Red Sea, and into the land that He had promised them.  This is the story of the Exodus, and is recorded for us in the second book of the Bible.  As the Israelites left Egypt God led them at night represented by a fire the people could see.  Like a child is comforted by their night light, so the children of Israel were comforted in their journey by the fire in the sky, reminding them that God was with them.

Fast forward 1,500 years to the time of Jesus.  While the rest of the Israelites were celebrating the Festival of the Tabernacle (remembering when God led them like a fire at night), Jesus makes an amazing assertion.  He says in John 8:12, “I am the light of the world.  Whoever follows Me will not walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”  In this statement, Jesus was making a few VERY important points:

  • Jesus is the light.  In the time of the Exodus, the people saw a fire cloud in the sky.  That was nice.  But, Jesus is even better!  The fire in the sky was a presence, but it was a presence that did not talk or provide a 3-D example of what God was like.  Jesus is our reminder that God is with us, a Living Light!
  • Jesus is the Light of the World!  In the time of the Exodus, the fire was only for the people of Israel.  However, by saying that Jesus was the light of the world, Jesus was pointing out that ALL people, regardless of nationality can be encouraged by His presence.
  • Jesus invites us to Follow Him.  His Light is not just meant to comfort, it is meant to direct.  
  • If we follow Him we will not walk in darkness.  Jesus will never lead us to sin.  He only leads us towards righteousness.  He is out for our growth, not our destruction.
  • If we follow Him, we will have life.  Darkness leads to death.  Don’t believe me?  Put your favorite flower in the dark closet for a week and see if it survives.  Jesus is the Light of Life . . . He came to give us life, not take it from us! 

At Christmas time, we often have lights as a part of our decorations:  on trees, on our homes, etc.  This is so appropriate, because Jesus is the Light of the world!  Lauren Daigle’s song “Light of the World” reminds us of that as well.  As we sing this song, or look at Christmas lights, be reminded of God’s presence with us, and His desire that we walk in obedience following Jesus’ commands and example.  If we do, we will have life as God intended!

Light of the World

The world waits for a miracle

The heart longs for a little bit of hope

Oh come, oh come, Emmanuel

A child prays for peace on Earth

And she’s calling out from a sea of hurt

Oh come, oh come, Emmanuel

And can you hear the angels singing

Glory to the light of the world

Glory, the light of the world is here

The drought breaks with the tears of a mother

A baby’s cry is the sound of love

Come down, come down, Emmanuel

He is the song for the suffering

He is Messiah, the Prince of Peace has come

He has come, Emmanuel

Glory to the light of the world

For all who wait

For all who hunger

For all who’ve prayed

For all who wonder

Behold your King

Behold Messiah

Emmanuel, Emmanuel

Glory to the light of the world

Glory to the light of the world

Glory to the light of the world

Behold your King

Behold Messiah

Emmanuel, Emmanuel

The world waits for the miracle

The heart longs for a little bit of hope

Oh come, oh come Emmanuel 

 

 

To access all 31 days of the “Christmas Light” Devotional, click here.

To access the “Christmas Light” Playlist:

“Christmas Light” Series Preview

Do you like Christmas lights?  I do.  I love them.  They are one of my favorite Christmas decorations.  We hang them from our roofline on the outside of our house.  We string them on trees and across the mantle inside our house.  We make plans to drive around and see the lights OTHER PEOPLE put on their houses.  It is all part of this season of celebration.

Why do I like Christmas lights so much?  

Maybe it goes back to my childhood when I was scared of the dark . . . maybe I have stock in OG&E . . . or maybe, just maybe, it is because Light is one of the Christmas “decorations” mentioned directly multiple times in Scripture.

Isaiah 9:2 speaks of “a great light” that has dawned, and Isaiah 42:6 talks about a “light for the nations.”  Both of these prophecies (given 700 years before Jesus’ birth) were pointing toward the day when a Child would be born that would be the “Light of men” (John 1:4).  At the birth of this Child, the sky “shone” above the place where He stayed as angels sang (Luke 2:9).  A new star rose in the sky, lighting the way for people of all nations to come and find Him (Matthew 2:2).  

Who was this light?  Of course, this Light was THE LIGHT . . . Jesus Christ.  It is appropriate to celebrate the birth of Jesus by hanging lights, because (from the very beginning) the Christmas story has been about the Light of God shining into the darkness, and the darkness not being able to overtake it.  

This is significant, because we live in a world of deep darkness.  Just in the past week I have heard about:

  • Marriages ending in divorce
  • Political corruption
  • Suicide and depression
  • Financial ruin, homelessness, and hunger
  • Wars
  • Persecution of Christians 
  • Disease
  • Abuse

It seems all around us are reminders of darkness. In the midst of this dark world, don’t you long for someone to “turn on the light”? What if I told you that Someone has turned on the light . . . in reality SOMEONE IS THE LIGHT!

I have found GREAT COMFORT in Jesus Christ.  He alone lights the darkness and provides life in the midst of the valley of the shadow of death.  

During the month of December, I invite you to join me at Wildwood Community Church on Sunday mornings at 9:45 and 11:00 as we bask together in the Christmas Light of Jesus.  Over the next 4+ weeks we will cover:

  • December 1 – “Light to those living in Shadows”Isaiah 9:1-7, Matthew 4:12-17
  • December 8 – “Light of Life . . . a Light Brighter than the Darkness” John 1:1-14
  • December 15 – “Light to the Captives for all Nations”Isaiah 42:1-9, Luke 2:29-32
  • December 22 – “Fear Not!  The Light is On”Luke 2:8-14
  • December 24 – “The Star Has Risen”Matthew 2:1-12

More than anything else, this is a series proclaiming HOPE to all of us who are living in this dark world.  We need not fear or despair . . . in fact we can worship and rejoice, because the Light  has overcome the darkness.

The Light of Christmas . . . is Christ!

Make plans to join us this Sunday . . . and invite your friends and family to come and sit with you this month as we celebrate this truth together.

 

NOTE:  I have written a 31 day devotional to accompany your Christmas season.  You can access that devotional by clicking here, or you can subscribe to this blog and have each daily installment of the devotional delivered to your inbox each morning beginning December 1.  The devotional is tied to 31 Christmas songs (and the Scripture behind them) and we have a playlist on Apple Music and Spotify.

Christmas Light: 2019 FREE 31 Day Devotional

In recent days much has been made about the separation of church and state.  Prayer is often discouraged in schools and the workplace, curriculums are scrubbed clean of faith-based answers to fact-based questions, and people often prefer religion to be practiced privately, not shared publicly.  This point of view wins the day much of the time in many people’s lives . . . with one notable exception.  At Christmas time, people still allow the Sacred to invade the secular — even INVITE IT onto the public stage in many ways.  What do I mean?

Our culture still celebrates the birth of Jesus Christ every December through music.  Places where God is not welcome 11 months of the year are often platforms of praise from Black Friday to Christmas Day.  All up and down the FM dial all Advent season, we hear deep theology being sung by today’s top artists.  Every trip to the store during the holidays plays out underneath the soundtrack of the Savior.  Rather than focusing on the irony of this reality, let’s enjoy it . . . and use it as a prompt for worship and evangelism during this busy season.

As we listen to this Christmas music, however, I wonder if we really know what we are singing.  After all, most of these songs are very familiar to us . . . we sing them every year . . . but do we really understand what they are talking about?  To say it another way, when we look at “The Christmas Carols” do we know the hope of Christmas past, present, and future?  

This 31 day devotional will take one Christmas song each day during the month of December and provide a reflection on how that song helps us understand more about Jesus and what it looks like for us to follow Him.  These devotionals are accessible in a variety of ways:

  • All 31 devotionals are accessible in electronic format.  To download all 31 devotionals in pdf format, click here.  To download all 31 devotionals in epub/ebook format, click here.
  • Each December morning at 6:00 AM CST (beginning December 1), that day’s devotional will post to my blog – pastormarkrobinson.com  You can always visit that location or check social media to see the latest post . . . or you can subscribe to my blog (at my blog site in the right hand column) to have the new posts forwarded to your email inbox as they post.

In addition to this, suggested versions of all 31 songs are available via Apple Music or Spotify via these links:

In Christ, 

Pastor Mark Robinson